What Are The Most Common Hand Injuries?

The human hand is extraordinary in design and function. The hand and the wrist contain a total of 27 bones in various sizes and lengths. Around the bones exists an assortment of nerves, muscles, tendons, ligaments and joint cartilage. Damage to any of these structures can cause various types of common hand injuries.

Carpal Tunnel

Caused by a pinching of the median nerve, carpal tunnel is more common amongst woman than men. Potential causes include:

  • Inflammation from arthritis.
  • Nerve damage from diabetes.
  • Repetitive flexing of the wrist.
  • Operation of vibrating tools.

Direct Blow or Impact

This acute injury commonly occurs from a fall, an abnormal bend, twist, or jerking of the hand. Common injuries include:

  • Skier’s thumb or UCL tear. Also known as a ligament injury.
  • Mallet or baseball finger. This is a bent fingertip caused by a ruptured tendon.
  • Sprains. This injury involves damage to the ligaments attached to the bone. Common injuries can range from a stretch in the ligament to a complete tear.
  • Compartment syndrome. This painful condition is when swelling takes place in an enclosed area. This puts pressure on the arteries, veins, and nerves which may cause permanent damage.
  • Broken bones. This includes fractures which can range from a hairline crack to being broken into two.
  • Dislocations. This common injury occurs often amongst athletes and hard physical labor occupations.

Burns

Various burns to the hand can often cause deformity, discoloration, loss of tissue, and blistering. Burns are often caused by:

  • Contact or proximity to a direct flame.
  • Hot liquids such as cooking oil and water.
  • Food burns.
  • Contact with a heated surface.

These common hand injuries can often cause short to long term and permanent damage. If any of these injuries occur, a medical evaluation is recommended. If you need an orthopedic surgeon for your hand injury, contact the team at Michigan Hand and Wrist to get help today. 

What Is Carpal Tunnel Pain Caused From?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a nerve compression disease in which someone will experience numbness, tingling, and even some pain in their hand or arm. In some more severe situations, it can make using the hand very uncomfortable and challenging. Ultimately, a pinched nerve located in the wrist causes carpal tunnel syndrome. There are several different common tasks that can often lead to carpal tunnel syndrome.

Keyboard Typing

One risk factor that can cause carpal tunnel syndrome is poor positioning of your hands while you are working with a computer. If you commonly use a keyboard or computer mouse, if you do not position your hand in the correct position, it could lead to a pinched nerve. To ensure that using the keyboard or mouse does not cause carpal tunnel, it would be beneficial to take breaks from typing every hour and to position your hands in a way that ensures your wrists and hands are supported. This will help to relieve stress and encourage better blood flow.

Construction Jobs

While some people develop carpal tunnel due to their work environment in an office, others can develop the symptoms if they work in a construction or other labor-intensive job. Those that use hand tools or other power tools will be exposed to prolonged vibrations from the machinery. These vibrations can cause undue stress on your wrists and hands. These can then result in a pinched nerve and the carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms.

Health Risk Factors

While there are physical jobs that can result in carpal tunnel syndrome, there are other risk factors that can result in it as well. Those with a range of risk factors will be more likely to develop the symptoms. These risk factors typically include those with diabetes, high blood pressure, or even thyroid dysfunction. Furthermore, those that are dealing with obesity and other related health concerns will be more susceptible to getting carpal tunnel syndrome.

If you’re looking for a reliable orthopedic surgeon, contact the team at Michigan Hand and Wrist today.